Lude Generation

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Confused's Long-Term Anglia Project

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 Postby Confused »Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:16 pm

Some changes to the forum means that the first picture after some text is picked up as the thread thumbnail image - so here's some random text followed by a picture:

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And now the thread starts here:
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I blame my dad entirely for my passion for cars. He's a mechanic by trade, but he also enjoys tinkering with cars in his free time.

So, I grew up surrounded by cars, and from an early age I wanted to spend all of my time with him, watching what he was doing, learning, and just generally getting under his feet and in his way. Fast forward to today, and I'm much the same, albeit now I've got a bit more knowledge, and am now a bit too tall to literally get "under his feet" (but I sometimes still do in the figurative way).

In the mid 90's, my dad got his 2nd Ford Anglia - a 1966 Deluxe, which was in quite a sad state, and needed a bit of repair work. Unfortunately time was tight, so it was completed, with a 1500GT engine (later a 1300 crossflow) and it went on the road. I loved going out in the car, it turned heads everywhere. A few years later, he picked up another, in worse condition! This one took longer to restore, but having done something with "period" mods, this one went extreme - he took the largest shoehorn he could find, and squeezed in the full running gear from a Subaru estate car - 1800cc flat four engine and full 4WD running gear.



In 2003 I managed to get hold of a 1967 Ford Anglia Deluxe, which had failed it's MOT on a few items and the current owner couldn't afford the repairs. I started off by getting myself a Mk2 Escort with a 1600 crossflow, with plans of putting that in. I made a start, but didn't get much further than stripping the car to mostly a bare shell with the Escort front suspension fitted, before other events took over and it got sidetracked.

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I then changed my daily driver to a Honda Prelude 2.2 VTEC, and decided that my "fun" weekend car shouldn't be slower than my daily driver, so got hold of a Nissan 200SX S13, with a 1800 turbo engine.

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I stripped this down, but before I could make a start, I ended up damaging my Prelude, so spent a few months rebuilding that! The Anglia took a back seat again. Unfortunately, it continued to take a back seat until October 2010, when I started again on it.

The years sat outside at my dad's place had taken their toll on the car, which had developed much more rust, and it required quite a bit more work than it would have done 6 years earlier...

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So we removed the rust, and using replacement body parts from the Owner's Club, repaired these areas and put strength back into the car.

Removing rust...
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Fitting new bits...
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Nice new, strong metal...
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Once the strength was put into the chassis, it was time to start thinking about fitting the running gear.

However, I'd since (again) changed my daily driver to a Mitsubishi Legnum VR-4, and the 1.8 turbo engine again would have been less powerful than my daily driver! So... I've changed the choice of engine (again)!


So, introducing the Mitsubishi 6A13TT engine, as is in my Legnum VR-4:

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2500cc, V6, 24 valve, quad cam, twin turbo, 280bhp.

With an engine from an old Galant (the saloon version of my Legnum estate), I decided to see whether it would fit in the engine bay of the Anglia.

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Lifting it towards the unsuspecting car

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With the turbos still attached... not quite, how about without the turbos?

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Much better!!

The 6A13 engine was never used in a Rear Wheel Drive vehicle by Mitsubishi, therefore, there are no gearboxes available “off the shelf” that will allow it to be used longitudinally.

The 6A13 is, however, compatible with gearboxes that also bolt up to the Lancer Evolution IV onwards 4G63T – but, the same problem comes – it comes in no vehicles where it’s used in a RWD configuration...

So… to the drawing board we go to find a gearbox.
Last edited by Confused on Tue May 07, 2013 9:52 am, edited 3 times in total.

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 Postby Confused »Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:16 pm

Profile Update - Start you muffin!


I left you last time with a marriage of an engine and a gearbox mated together - which even I wasn't sure would have worked until we managed it!

The next issue to tackle was that of actually starting the car. Our adapter plates were taken back to our local engineer with some more rough scribbles, and they were returned with some new holes.

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A minor tweak, and the starter bolted up to the engine, and in line with the flywheel - and then, for the moment of truth... would it work?



Success! Next, to get the starter fitted to the gearbox. A small bit of cutting later...

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As you can hopefully see, the starter is rather close to the crossmember - and the gearbox is currently lifted higher than it will usually sit - which means that the starter will be trying to sit in the crossmember, so some modifications are required.

So, we cut away a section, and reinforced where we'd removed, as well as reinforcing where we'd cut away the original engine mounts, as we'd not be needing them.

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The eagle-eyed among you may have noticed a couple of blocks of wood between the front crossmember and the sump of the engine in the final picture of my last update - this is what was supporting the engine in the right position. I don't think that would have been a long-term solution, so a proper engine mount is required.

Upon my browsing of forums as I usually do of an evening, I happened upon someone selling a brand new engine mount from a Honda Integra DC2 - which looked like it might fit the bill. I promptly purchased it, and work began on making it fit. A large chunk of the original engine mount was removed, and a wonderful looking mounting bracket was created.

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In order to support this, we'd need some quite hefty bracing, so the remainder of the bodywork was removed, and some additional box section was grafted into place.

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The engine was then lifted back into position, and the front engine mount was affixed securely to a beefy bit of box section, and the engine suspended from it, and the gearbox crossmember.

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With the front and rear mounts sorted, something was needed to stop the roll of the engine. Using the mount from the Honda Integra gave me another idea. I often see Hondas with "engine torque dampers" to reduce the engine movement from their huge torque outputs *snigger* - these are small units which don't take up much room... perfect for this case.

So, a couple were purchased, and mounts made to prevent the roll on the engine.

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There we are - that should damp more torque than the 2 Hondas they were no doubt previously destined for!


And finally - another treat, a video which is "out of order" of the text above, but I couldn't leave this update without putting it in!

Last edited by Confused on Mon May 20, 2013 2:17 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Postby Confused »Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:18 pm

Profile Update - It’s under control


I thought it about time some control was brought to this project!

So, first off, how about some engine control, with the beginning of some of the multitude of wiring? I'm stripping out wiring for any systems that were present on the Galant, and won't be on the Anglia.

So, that means removing: ABS, ASC, AYC, SRS, TCL and Automatic Gearbox ECU.

After starting with the engine and ECU looms, and re-routing, we're currently set up as such:

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Before going too much further with the wiring under the dash, a small amount of adjustment is required to fit the water manifold to the back of the engine. Firstly we had to trim down the top of the gearbox casing.

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And in order to run the coolant hoses to the front, a small amount from the bulkhead.

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Next on the agenda is some way of telling the car where to go, so... one Mitsubishi steering column and wheel :)

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With the ability to steer, I think the ability to move and stop might be the next logical step.

Before:
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After:
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The clutch/brake pedals are an old set of dual controls which were removed from another car, and the accelerator is from the 200SX.

Now that the steering and pedals are done, the bit of floor that had been hacked about to previously fit the Escort steering column was then replaced with a nice fresh bit of steel.

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Last edited by Confused on Mon May 20, 2013 2:17 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Postby Confused »Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:19 pm

Profile Update - Have we blown it?


As I removed every single piece of wiring and all associated systems, I know what I don't need, so we started at those components and worked into the loom.

So, for ABS, we found all the wiring that went to that, and chopped. Same with the automatic gearbox ECU, same with TCL and SRS ECUs. There's still quite a bit to remove from the loom, the stuff so far is just the engine loom! There's the loom for the rest of the car still to sort.



Daz, that looks awesome! What power plant did you stick in there? And what is the rear axle?



Next Update:

The biggest issue we've been worrying about is how we're going to fit the turbos. They won't fit in their standard locations. We decided to bite the bullet, and try to come up with a solution.

We took a trip to our local engineering firm again with a rear turbo, and a sheet of steel, and came back with a set of flanges:

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One of the flanges bolted to the rear manifold:

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A small bit of nice thick pipe (Mitsubishi L200 rear bumper bar):

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And one turbo in place:

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Now to rinse and repeat for the other side:

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Next step is the downpipes, so out with a nice bit of stainless steel rear bumper bar, marked out, cut and welded into place:

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Once we'd marked up where the downpipe would fit, we extended the hole in the flange to incorporate the wastegate before welding it all together.


Well... that wasn't as bad as we expected - only a day to mount two turbos and one exhaust downpipe. So, yes, we have blown it now! ;)
Last edited by Confused on Mon May 20, 2013 2:16 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Postby Confused »Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:19 pm

Profile Update - Scrapheap Challenge


With one downpipe completed, it's time to move the turbo back to the other side, and make another.

So, one flange marked and hole enlarged to suit and welded together:

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And fitted in place:

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Once that was done, we moved efforts onto the brake/clutch, which we'd started a couple of days ago. We had sitting around brake and clutch master cylinders from a Honda Prelude, so began trying to make them fit. However, the brake master cylinder was too big, and we couldn't get a smooth enough action.

We had to take a trip to the scrapyard to get rid of some old junk, so we did our "Scrapheap Challenge" bit and looked around, and came back with a brake master cylinder from a 2001 Fiat Punto, which wasn't as long, and, we made up a bracket to hold them in place. Also from the Punto came the reservoir, which is shared between brake and clutch - which means less things to fit into the engine bay on the Anglia!

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Last edited by Confused on Mon May 20, 2013 2:16 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Postby Confused »Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:20 pm

Profile Update - Propped up, shafted and blown twice


This will be the final update from the week of work on the Anglia, so we finished the week by finishing up a couple of bits that had been partly started.

First off, the propshaft. The Nissan propshaft was the perfect length to mate up the gearbox and the standard Anglia rear axle, but it wasn't supported at it's centre joint, well, other than by a small piece of electrical wire!

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A more permanent solution was required, so a couple of small bits of box section, with a bolt welded in place, and then welded to the inside of the transmission tunnel should do the trick:

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Moving into the car, and the steering shaft needed supporting between two of the joints. A simple bracket, and that was done:

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I also managed to pick up another rear turbo and manifold, as well as a manual throttle body, which doesn't have the Traction Control stuff on the side of it. We bolted the turbos into place, and we could now see how the space was being used up quite quickly!

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During the making of the pipework for the turbos, we decided to drag the fibreglass flip front out, and put it on the car, to ensure we'd have the required clearance under the bonnet for the myriad of pipework that will be required. So, here's a couple of photos of it looking somewhat more like a normal Ford Anglia.

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Unfortunately the current schedule of visits every 4 weeks means that the next scheduled visit falls on the weekend Christmas, so no work will get done then! So, you'll have to tune in at the end of January for the next instalment!
Last edited by Confused on Mon May 20, 2013 2:16 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Postby Confused »Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:20 pm

Profile Update - Relax, take a seat


Continuing the tradition of "do something when we think about it", the next thing we decided to tackle was the seats.

Going to the magical store room of bits that my dad has acquired over the years, we managed to find a pair of seats that were originally in a Mitsubishi Lancer Evolution VI, that were removed by Ralliart when they fitted the Recaro seats prior to selling them through the UK dealer networks.

So, we measured up, marked, measured up again, cut, put in place, and bolted/welded some supports to the floor, which will both reinforce where the seats will sit, and also allow the seat to be both level, square, and moveable.

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This then allowed the seats to be put in place, and bolted down securely.

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Attention next moved to the engine again, and the eternal question that we've been asking since deciding to use this engine... how are we going to actually plumb in all of the inlet pipework!?

I've been wanting to put an intercooler at the front of the car, not only does it look cool, but it will keep the inlet temperatures down. Which would mean combining the output from the two turbos, installing the intercooler, piping to and from it, and then round to the inlet on the back of the engine. Not to mention, that the pipework from the filter to the turbos also has to be put in place!

However, putting my sensible hat on, this is not going to be a track car, this is not going to be used at full power for prolonged periods (there's nowhere other than a track where I could potentially even use it for those purposes!) - so a decision was made to do away with the intercooler.

This made the decision on the pipework much simper - it wouldn't need to come down to the front of the car, so that space can be free up for pre-turbo pipework, and more essential stuff like a coolant radiator and fans!

To that end, we got to work.

First off was to turn the compressor side of the driver's side turbo round, and making up a bracket to hold the wastegate actuator in the correct place.

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From the original VR4, I had the Y pipe that usually runs across the top of the engine, and I also acquired another. These got chopped up for bits, and a new Y pipe was made, bringing the outlet from both turbos to the centre of the engine, to head to the back, ready to loop round and into the throttle body.

As they say, a picture is worth a thousand words...

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A couple of brackets will need to be removed from the intake plenum so that it will sit down flush, but that'll be a task for next time.

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Last edited by Confused on Mon May 20, 2013 2:15 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Postby Confused »Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:20 pm

Profile Update - Braking news


Although it's hardly happened so far, which I for one am exceptionally surprised about, something that we've done hasn't been quite right, and could be improved upon.

This something was the brake & clutch master cylinders.

The place we'd positioned them previously meant that the movement on the arms from the pedals wasn't entirely smooth, and there was little space between them and the throttle body, so getting some kind of pipework onto the throttle body would have proved very difficult.

Therefore, it was decided to move them, and do our most major bit of bodywork refabrication to date.

A section of the bulkhead was cut out, and a new bit welded in which will allow the master cylinders to be recessed slightly, and further back.

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This brought the arms from the pedals to a more upright position, and is acting more directly on the pistons within the cylinders. It also gives more clearance between the throttle body and the pedal arms, which was then improved further, by a few modifications to the inlet plenum.

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Due to the reorientation of the turbo and the inlet pipework, the plenum required a few brackets removing, and an end chopped off, so that it will sit fully down onto the engine. A small amount was taken from the end where the throttle body is, to angle the throttle body upwards slightly, again giving more clearance for the intake pipework to fit.

The plenum will be taken to be welded up fully soon.

Some water pipes were also made up on both sides of the engine for cooling of the turbos.

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Last edited by Confused on Mon May 20, 2013 2:15 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Postby Confused »Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:20 pm

Profile Update - Engine and gearbox removal


We've come to a point where the engine and gearbox being in the car is preventing us from moving on.

There's minor tweaks that need to take place to the inner wings with a large hammer, there's more pipework for the turbos to be made, and stuff like brake/clutch lines to be made up, and all of this stuff will be much easier with the engine and gearbox not in the way.

We disconnected the wiring from the engine, dropped the front crossmember down to allow us room to move the engine, and decided to see whether we could remove both engine and gearbox as one complete unit.

We couldn't.

There was not enough movement for the sump to clear the front chassis rail. We'd already decided long ago that we'd remove this and replace it with a bolt-in section, and now seemed the perfect opportunity to do so.

We made some measurements, and went about cutting this front rail out. It went with a small "ping" as the chassis, relieved of tension, sprung apart by about 5mm. Good job we'd measured first!

With the bulk removed, we continued lifting the engine and gearbox out.

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(Excuse my dad's "I'm looking quite smug" look! I was actually sporting one too, but seeing as I was behind the camera, not in front of it...)

With the engine out, we moved it onto the bench, and could see better the oil filter in place on the side of the block (usually on a VR-4 there is a 90 degree adapter and it's lower down, facing upwards), the turbo coolant pipework, as well as the adapters to move the turbos to a more suitable location.

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(Some blatant product placement again... but you can't beat a nice Hobnob and a cup of coffee to keep your strength up!)

With the engine and gearbox safely on the bench, attention turned to putting the strength back into the chassis that we'd cut out earlier.

We began by removing the remaining parts of the original front panel.

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Then made up and welded in place some new bits, along with studs for location and securing.

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The new crossmember was made up with brackets on the ends.

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And bolted into place.

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This is bolted both from the front, and the sides, and will pull the chassis rails back together to the same measurements they were before removing the original front panel.

Next, we added some mounts for the anti-roll bar.

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The left-over time today was used to do a little bit of welding to tidy up a previously added panel - the driver's floor pan.

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We also added an additional mounting bolt for the suspension crossmember, just behind where we'd added the support for the engine roll-stop mounts (not pictured, but just behind the support to the left of the above photo)
Last edited by Confused on Mon May 20, 2013 2:15 pm, edited 2 times in total.

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 Postby JayJay »Thu Apr 12, 2012 3:34 pm

Very nice project, can't wait to see it finished :clap:
Shiny wrote:I sniff dirty pants.


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