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My 1999 Honda s2000 [AP1]

Got a car that isn't a Lude? There's no condemnation here. Tell us about it!
geriatrix
Posts: 31
Joined: Thu Jul 05, 2012 4:24 pm
My Generation: 5G
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My 1999 Honda s2000 [AP1]

Post by geriatrix » Sat Oct 10, 2020 8:19 pm

Good to hear the update, I'm sure your s2000 is wonderful now after all your care and attention. The same care and attention that you lavished on your Prelude 5G, which has now been mine for a good few years now, and is still going strong.

User avatar
prelude_h22
Posts: 749
Joined: Tue Jul 24, 2012 6:35 pm
My Generation: 5G
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My 1999 Honda s2000 [AP1]

Post by prelude_h22 » Fri Jan 01, 2021 3:25 pm

Hi Guys,

Happy New Year to all.

I hope everyone is keeping safe throughout these strange and tough times.

I haven’t managed to enjoy the s2000 very much in 2020 due to obvious reasons.
Most of my road trips and track days were cancelled, I have however managed to do some further maintenance work on her.

Another long update which I hope you will enjoy!

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Task 66 – MOT Time
29-02-2020


Just before the covid-19 pandemic hit, the country was still pretty much normal.
The second MOT test in my ownership for the s2000 was again due.

On a chilly rainy morning I headed down to my local MOT test centre.

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Fantastic news. The s2000 passed with no advisories.
It was the same dude who tested my car last year, and he commented that the car is still in great shape.

A great result. Another year of motoring : )


Parts Purchased:
None

Services Used:
None

Resources used
None

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Task 67 – Piston Heads - Readers Car of the Week
28-03-2020

Whilst browsing Piston Heads one evening during lock down, I noticed that an image of my s2000 was used on an article.
To my surprise, it was an article about my s2000 and my project thread.

Lovely to see an average car enthusiast get a little recognition : )


Thanks to Matt Bird @ PistonHeads for the feature "Readers Car of The Week"

https://www.pistonheads.com/news/ph-jap ... week/42126


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Task 68 – Engine Service and Transmission Oil Change
12-04-2020

By this time, the country was in lockdown. Although I was still working from home, the weekend allowed some time to perform some maintenance tasks on the s2000.
Not being in contact with anyone it was a perfect opportunity.

Having purchased all what I needed before the lockdown, everything was already to hand.
This was quite lucky as most of the suppliers/shops had closed down in order to follow government guide lines for safety.

As I was performing both the engine oil and transmission fluid change, It was best to get the car up on all four axle stands.
I had to purchase another pair of axle stands as I only had the one pair.


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The standard engine service consisted of an Oil and filter change.
This was pretty straight forward. This time round I replaced the oil sump plug with a brand new OEM Honda one.
I stuck to using the Castrol Edge 5w 40 in the end. It seems that the f20 loves this stuff.

However, I do find it tricky when reading the level of the dipstick when Castrol edge oil is used.
Due to the golden transparent colour of Castrol Edge it is tricky to see it on the dipstick.
Shell helix and motul oil's are a tad darker in colour.

Next was the transmission oil change.
Performance Autoworks did this for me when I first got the car during the clutch change back in June 2018.
After doing a track day at Brand Hatch and a few sessions at the Nurburgring last year I thought it couldn’t hurt for another change.
It would also be nice to experience doing the transmission oil change on the s2000 myself.

The tool that is required for this is a pump, as you cannot gravity pour oil into the gearbox with it being a side entry fill directly under the car.

The fill bolt was cracked open first (important) as you do not want to drain the oil, and then not being able to undo the fill bolt to refill the gearbox.

Due to the limited space, with me on my lying on my back I really struggled removing the gearbox drain bolt.
Eventually it cracked open with the help of my breaker bar.
Several taps with a metal mallet would have helped here. Duly noted for next time.

The gearbox oil was then drained, the oil looked clean with no metal shavings which was a good sign.
The drain bolt was cleaned using a wire brush, and a new washer was inserted and installed back on the gearbox.


Then the rain came. Haha. It was quite an amazing turn of the weather. When I headed down stairs it was clear blue skies, then without notice the grey clouds came.
It down poured for around 10 mins. I had to jump into the car to wait until it cleared.
As you can imagine, quite frustrated. Haha. (All my tools getting wet)


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After a good 20mins the skies eventually cleared and I cracked on.

I used a Sealey TP6804 multipurpose mini pump. I was really crossing my fingers that it worked reliably otherwise I would have been stuck.
The pump was tested briefly with some engine oil on the day I got it, so I was pretty confident it would do the job well.

With the pump topped up with Genuine Honda’s MTF fluid, I inserted the hook in the fill bolt hole and began to pump.
After around a litre and half it began to drip out of the fill bolt which signifies that the gearbox was filled to capacity.
Again, the fill bolt was wire brushed, new washer inserted and installed back on the gearbox


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Bolts were torque up as per Honda’s recommendations.

Oil filter : 16 lbf-f
Sump Plug : 29 lbf-f
Gearbox Fill : 33 lbf-f
Gearbox Drain : 29 lbf-f


Changing the gearbox oil significantly improved the shift feel.
A highly recommended job, it's easy and enjoyable too.


Note: I highly recommend the Clarke CTJ1250AB 1.25 ton Aluminium Low Trolley Jack.
The s2000 is already pretty low and this trolley jack is able to be inserted at the front of the car to lift it centrally.
It completely clears my genuine front lip too. I am on stock suspension so it would not work if your car is lowered.
I have had this jack for over 10 years, it’s the lightest one out there and has proven to be very reliable.




Whilst performing the above tasks, I also noticed that the front passenger side brake line grommet which goes through the arch seemed to have ripped apart.
This has been noted and a new part will be ordered from Honda so it can be replaced.

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Parts Purchased:
Part: Genuine Honda MTF3 Fluid (x2 litres)
Part Number: 082679-990-2HE
Supplier: Honda247

Part: Engine Oil Filter (Genuine Honda) (Also included sump drain washer)
Part Number: 15400-PCX-004
Supplier: Honda247

Part: Castrol Edge FST 5w/40 Fully Synthetic Oil (5 litres)
Part Number: Edge 5w40
Supplier: Coxmotorparts

Part: Sealey Multi Purpose Mini Pump
Part Number: TP6804
Supplier: Ebay - Folkestonefixings

Part: Genuine Honda Sump Plug & Washer
Part Number: 90009PY3000
Supplier: Coxmotorparts

Part: Genuine Honda Gearbox Fill Washer
Part Number: 94109-2000 (20mm)
Supplier: Coxmotorparts

Part: Genuine Honda Gearbox Drain Washer
Part Number: 94109-14000 (14mm)
Supplier: Coxmotorparts

Part: Sealey Folding Axle Stands
Part Number: AS2000F
Supplier: Amazon UK




Services Used:
None

Resources used

Torque Specs
https://www.s2ki.com/forums/s2000-libra ... cs-500969/

YouTube Video - DIYguys
"Changing Your s2000 Transmission Fluid"


YouTube Video - DIYguys
"s2000 Oil and Filter Change"


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Task 69 – Rear Differential Fluid Change
26-04-20

I was unable to perform this task during the engine oil and transmission fluid change, due to not having a 23mm spanner to undo the differential fill bolt.
Luckily there were a few sellers on eBay who were still posting out during the lockdown, and I managed to get one within the week.

So the following week I decided to crack on changing the differential fluid.
I had to jack the car again on all four axles stands to ensure the differential was properly drained and filled.

With both the drain and fill bolts easily accessible, I got to work.

Tapping a mallet against your wrench/spanner to help crack open the bolts is a very handy tip. The bolts will be pretty tight.

You need a 23mm spanner for the fill bolt, a socket wrench will not fit.
Once the fill bolt was removed, the drain bolt was removed using a normal 24mm socket wrench.

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Note that the drain bolt is a factory OEM magnetic bolt and designed to catch metal shavings in the differential.
The bolts looked clean and hardly any debris attached to it.

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The bolts were looking a tad tired, but still in good condition.
I cleaned the bolts as best I could with a wire brush and it was a significant improvement

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A new washer was inserted to the drain bolt and reinstalled to OEM torque settings

Bolts were torque up as per Honda’s recommendations.

Diff Drain Bolt : 33 lbf-f
Diff Fill Bolt : 33 lbf-f


The same method using the Sealey TP6804 mini pump was used. Genuine Honda Hypoid gear oil was used and only a tad under 1 litre was required.

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After the task was completed, a wire brushed was used to clean as much corrosion as I could from the differential casing.
Looking much cleaner although I guess it wouldn’t really last long considering the winters we get.

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It took longer to haul all my equipment downstairs from my flat, and raising the car on the jack stands than doing the job. Haha.

Overall an enjoyable easy task that will surely benefit the car.

Make sure you get the correct diff oil. Honda Hypoid rear Diff Oil (not to be confused to the diff oil for CRVs)
Using the wrong diff oil will damage the diff on your s2000.
If using other brands, check on the correct viscosities



Parts Purchased:
Part: Genuine Honda HGO-3 Hypoid Rear Differential Oil (1 Litre Required)
Part Number: 0829499901HE
Supplier: Honda247

Part: Genuine Honda Rear Differential Fill Washer
Part Number: 90402-PCZ-003
Supplier: Coxmotorparts

Part: Genuine Honda Rear Differential Drain Washer
Part Number: 90401-PCZ-003
Supplier: Coxmotorparts

Part: Bergen US Pro 23m Spanner
Part Number: N/A
Supplier: Ebay - whitehorsetools


Services Used:
None

Resources used
Torque Specs
https://www.s2ki.com/forums/s2000-libra ... cs-500969/

YouTube Video - DIYguys
"Changing Your s2000 Differential Fluid"


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Task 70 – Dinitrol Underseal Underside of Boot Area
26-04-20

Just after performing the rear diff oil change, I thought I would apply some Dinitrol 4941 underseal spray to the underside of the boot area.
The car was already jacked up on all fours so it was the perfect opportunity.
Whilst this area was clean and rust free, it wouldn’t hurt to apply some of this stuff to help protect this area for the future.

A quick wire brush on any loose dirt and debris, made sure the area was clean enough for application.

Dinitrol 4941 is superb stuff and nice and easy to apply.
Easy to control whilst covering areas you don’t want sprayed easily with scrap cardboard or paper.

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Please with the results, it looks alot better.


Parts Purchased:
Part: Dinitrol 4941 Underseal Aerosol Spray
Part Number: 4941
Supplier: Ebay - Rejelrustproofing

Services Used:
None

Resources used
None

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Task 71 – Lockdown Wash Clean and Polish
03-05-20

During lock down, driving was pretty much only for essential journeys. So the s2000 hadn't been driven for a while.
I had also neglected it alttle and haven’t washed it for at least 2 months.

So I thought I’d spend a whole day cleaning the car.
It had been pretty warm over the past few months, so the car was covered in cob webs and general dirt.

Not having a jet wash or running water, it was down to my trusty mobi v17 portable battery pressure washer.
Whilst it held 17 litres of water, I had to bring an additional 2x 5 litre bottles of extra water with me due to how dirty she was.

I can happily say the s2000 was treated that day, I gave it a thorough wash, inside and out including the engine bay.
Being a 90s Honda design, the engine bay isn’t 100% sealed from the outside, so debris and leaves can enter from the sides of the bonnet.
The engine bay wasn’t too bad and cleaned up really well.

The body was treated to a simple autoglym polish.

Whilst the body work on the s2000 isn’t perfect, some of the areas looked good : )

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Parts Purchased:
None

Services Used:
None

Resources used
None


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Task 72 – Lockdown Shopping Trip
30-05-20

As the s2000 now hadn’t been used in months, and journeys were still only essential. I decided to take it shopping instead of the Accord.
It was a great opportunity to give it a little run. Shopping was limited due to the small boot, but it was awesome to drive it again.

A quick trip to our local Asda’s allowed the s2000 to stretch its legs abit.
Our local Asda’s has a nice underground car park, so I took some quick photos.

Just love the s2000 shape, it doesn’t seem to age at all.


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Parts Purchased:
None

Services Used:
None

Resources used
None


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Task 73 – Arch Cleanse/Calliper Refresh/Hardtop Clean
29-06-20

As the lock down began to ease, my brother invited me round to his place to use his driveway so I could do some car maintenance stuff. I thought it would be a perfect opportunity to clean the arches using his garden hose and with his quick help to remove the hard top for general cleaning and checks.

I arrived at his place pretty early and got to work straight away. I also purchased a new toy to help with the job.
I have always removed the wheel bolts manually using a wheel wrench for the past 20 years, but I treated myself and purchased a compact portable impact gun. This is thing is amazing, for such a small size the wheel bolts came off with no trouble.


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Its astonishing how much time and effort it can save. The car can now all be jacked up at the same time without having to loosen the wheel bolts first.

With the front end jacked up I got to work.
My brothers hose trigger had a shampoo bottle attachment which sprays the soap as foam.
I then agitated the dirt with a detailing type brush and then used the hose to rinse.
The process was very enjoyable and satisfying.

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I speeded up the drying process by wiping down areas with a dry old micro fibre cloth.
Once dry, I quickly coated the callipers with a fresh coat of silver hammerite paint.

I inspected the arches and control arms to make sure the dinitrol coating was all still intact and touched up areas where it had chipped away from road debris. Overall the arches were in great condition.

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The arch liners were looking quite faded, so I used some Chemical Guys Barebones Under Carriage Spray which my brother had.
I gently sprayed it on the liner and rubbed it in.
Looks fantastic and hopefully provides a lasting finish

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The process was repeated for the rears.

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Parts Purchased:
Part: Worx WX279xxxx Impact Gun
Part Number: WX279
Supplier: Amazon UK

Part: Sealey 19mm Impact Socket
Part Number: IS1219D
Supplier: Amazon UK

Part: Hammerite Smooth Silver Paint
Part Number: N/A
Supplier: Halfords (Already to hand)

Part: Chemical Guys Bare Bones Undercarriage Spray
Part Number: N/A
Supplier: Slimsdetailing.co.uk



Services Used:
None

Resources used
None





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Task 74 – Hardtop Removal and Check
29-06-20


With the above completed, it was a perfect opportunity to remove the hardtop to check and regrease the seals and to check if there were any leaks.
It would also be a good opportunity to operate the soft top to see if everything was still intact.

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After losing my storage the hardtop now had to remain on the car permanently. Whilst I didn't mind as I do prefer the look of the s2000 with the hard top on, there is no other car that can offer the top down Vtec experience.

The hardtop has now been on the car for around 2 years.
With rear hooks and front latches disengaged, the hardtop came off with ease with the help of my brother to lift it off.

Everything still looked great, there were no signs of any water leaking in and it all looked dry.

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The hardtops rear main seals were also checked and all looked in great shape.
They were thoroughly cleaned with Shen itsu grease reapplied, and also along the main body channel line too.

I took the car for a quick drive and activated the soft top, and although the hood's material was rather stiff, it operated fine with alitlle help to pull it down so it could lock in place.
The hood also looked in good shape with no tears or damage that could be seen.

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The hardtop was reinstalled and I was satisfied everything was in great shape.


Parts Purchased:
Part: Genuine Honda Shin-Etsu Grease (for hardtop seals)
Part Number: 087989013
Supplier: Coxmotorparts (Already to hand from Task 42)

Services Used:
None

Resources used
None



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Task 75 – Rear Bumper Fender Clip / Rear Flap Guard Refurbish
05-07-20


Next task was sort out a few minor niggles.

The first was to replace the rear fender bumper screw with the proper OEM clip.
This has been on the "to-do" list for quite some time now, but just haven't got round to sourcing and replacing the clip as it wasn't really a priority.

Assumed it was performed by the previous owner perhaps from removing the bumper and losing or breaking the original clip. They actually installed a large self tapping screw in its place.

It was a horrendous sight to say the least.
Thankfully the mating section for the clip was intact and undamaged apart from a small hole which the tapping screw made.

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The OEM clips from Honda were quite expensive, but I managed to find a supplier on Ebay for OEM equivalents. The quality was fantastic and fitted perfectly.

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Whilst being in that area, the front arch flaps were looking rather tired.
To remove these the wheels had to be removed, the impact gun came in handy here and with the trolley jack to hand, the flaps were removed in no time.

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With the flaps from both sides to hand, I quickly rubbed them down with some sand paper (not too sure of the grade - it was anything I could find in the tool box at the time) but it wasn't very abrasive. They were washed and then a quick coat of Halfords flexible bumper spray was applied.

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They will see constant abuse from the road, so I didn't spend too much time on them

They came out pretty nice and OEM looking.

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Very happy with the results.


Parts Purchased:
Part: Rear Fender Clips (x2)
Part Number: 90108-SW3-003
Supplier: Ebay – ADL Components

Part: Halfords Plastic Bumper Spray (Black)
Part Number: 325175
Supplier: Halfords


Services Used:
None

Resources used
None


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Task 76 – IACV and Vtec Solenoid Gasket Seal Replacement (Notes on Upper Vtec Solenoid Seal)
12-07-20

With the car now being over 20 years old, I thought I would best tackle a couple of the common gasket seal replacements. They currently were not leaking, but there were was no history of them ever being replaced.

Leaks often occur around the Vtec solenoid as the car ages due to the rubber seal deteriorating through hot and cold cycles. With my one potentially being over 20 years old, I thought it would be a nice preventative maintenance exercise.

The replacement was super easy and with the vtec solenoid super accessible.

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The only thing to watch out for is dripping oil for when you detach the solenoid away from the engine block. Just have some old rags ready to catch the spill.

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Notice how flat the original seal is.

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Also, ensure to torque up the bolts to spec. Over tightening them will surely ruin your day.
The engine block is aluminium and can be cross threaded very easily.


The other seal I wanted to replace was the IACV (intake air control valve). This device is responsible for engine idle. Often over looked and forgotten about, it is also highly recommended to fully clean this device if you are having idle issues.

The removal of the IACV valve was also super easy with it being nicely accessible.
Removal of a few pipes and a couple of bolts, it comes out with ease.

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The seal was replaced with no trouble.
I did remove and clean this device back in 2018 as one of my first maintenance tasks.
After inspecting it, the IACV still remains in good clean condition therefore a clean was not necessary.

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Again, careful not to over tighten these bolts.
Use a good quality torque wrench where possible.

Nice and easy hassle free maintenance jobs.


There is another gasket seal on the upper portion of the Vtec solenoid.
Unfortunately, Honda never made this available to purchase separately. You have to purchase the entire Vtec solenoid part which can cost in excess of £500. This also means that the gasket seal itself does not have an individual Honda part number.

Thankfully there is an individual who has developed a gasket seal which has proved to be of very high quality and is known to last according to many s2ki members. They are based in the USA and they are known as "Kraken Automotive"

I have inserted a link to their Ebay shop for the seal down below.
A reasonable £20.13 shipped from the USA (as of 06-08-20), it is the perfect solution.

From forum feedback, stay away from the seal offered by Ballade Sports and other Chinese suppliers.
They are of very poor quality and leak after a few months.

I have purchased one and will keep it as a backup ready to replace if my one starts to leak.

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Parts Purchased:
Part: IACV (Intake Air Control Valve) Seal Gasket
Part Number: 36461-PAA-A01
Supplier: Tegiwa

Part: Vtec Solenoid Seal Gasket
Part Number: 15825-PCX-015
Supplier: Tegiwa

Part: UPPER Vtec Solenoid Seal Gasket
Part Number: N/A
Supplier: Ebay - USA Seller "Kraken Automotive"


Services Used:
None

Resources used
YouTube Video - DIYguys
"s2000 Vtec Gasket Seal Change"


YouTube Video - DIYguys
"s2000 UPPER Vtec Gasket Seal Ballade Version Trials"


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Task 77 – Upper Front Bumper Stiffener Replacement and x2 Bumper Bolts
12-07-20

After replacing the seals in the previous task, another quick job on the list was to replace the front bumper upper stiffener bar. There were also two non standard Allen key head bolts used on the outer sections. Again, after seeing the self tapping screw used on the rear bumper I wasn't surprised.

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It was a simple replacement. The current bumper bar was quite corroded and the previous owner did try to refurbish it but performed a really poor job on it.

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The outer two Allen key bolts were removed, and genuine Honda replacements installed with a touch of copper grease to the threads to prevent corrosion. These bolts are notorious for seizing up so copper greasing all the bolts is highly recommended.

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The rubber seal which surrounds the stiffener was still in excellent condition, so it was re-used.

Another small low priority task completed


Parts Purchased:
Part: Genuine Honda Upper Front Bumper Stiffener Bar
Part Number: 71103-S2A-000
Supplier: Tegiwa
Web Link: https://www.tegiwaimports.com/genuine-h ... gJut_D_BwE

Part: genuine Honda Bumper Bolts
Part Number: 90130-SR2-003
Supplier: Tegiwa
Web Link: https://www.tegiwaimports.com/select-ca ... ic-eg.html


Services Used:
None

Resources used
None


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Task 78 – Radiator Stays/Battery Tie/Coolant Bracket/Fuse Box Brackets Power Coat Refurb
12-07-20

After completing the above task, the next stage was to get a few tired looking brackets refurbished.

Again, the previous owner tried to refurb these brackets themselves and performed a poor job on these too. Brand new Honda items are just too expensive, with x1 Honda radiator stay costing £35 each.
The fuse box brackets are no longer available, so I had to be careful not to lose these.

I initially started to wire brush them down to quickly spray them with satin Hammerite spray paint, but I then thought to properly refurb these, they have to be blasted and powder coated for a long lasting finish.
There are many aftermarket alternatives for the radiator stays and battery tie down, but I wanted to retain all OEM items where possible.

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After alittle searching, I found a company called Rheal Coatings Co, and sent him a quick message.
Quick friendly response I stated my requirements and Ryan quoted me a price.

Refurb all brackets: Powder coat in Satin black colour
With postage back to me: £35.00

I thought that was a great price.
I would be posting it out to him on a Tuesday (first class recorded), and he stated that he will get the parts back to me by the weekend.

I got a notification on the Friday that DPD was to deliver a package to me
(to my amazement these were the brackets being delivered back), Fantastic Service.

Unfortunately DPD being a typical courier, they stated I wasn't in.
I was working at home that day and clearly they didn't ring the bell. Very frustrated, especially after the efforts from Ryan getting the parts out to me by the weekend.

Eventually they delivered on the Monday.
Impressed with the turnaround time and finish.
They look factory OEM fresh.

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Highly recommend Ryan at Rheal Coating Co for your powder coating needs.
Friendly with a fast turnaround.

Installation was super quick and simple, with copper grease being applied to all bolts to help with any future corrosion issues. They look smart and freshen up the engine bay.

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Super satisfied



Parts Purchased:
None


Services Used:
Rheal Coatings Co
Contact: Ryan
Email: info@rhealcoating.co.uk
Phone Number: 07539377740
https://www.facebook.com/Rhealcoatings/

Resources used
None


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Task 79 – Fuel Weep 1 (Fuel Injector Seals)
13-07-20

Originally noticed back in task 71 on 29-06-20 on the way to my brothers place for the arch cleanse work, I noticed a slight odour of fuel entering the cabin. It soon disappeared and I didn't take much noticed after that.

Later on that day, I had alittle investigation around the engine bay and the issue soon became apparent. There was a slight fuel weep around injector number 2.

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Initially I thought it was the seals, so I decided to overhaul the upper and lower injector seals on all four injectors. A quick message to coxmotorparts, I soon had them on order and arriving within a few days as they had stock. Fantastic service from Coxmotprparts.

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After some research on tackling the seal replacement, the job turned out to be pretty straight forward. The whole assembly is very easy to access and the main fuel dampener inlet pipe does not need to be unbolted. (this is the part which looks like a white plastic cap on the fuel rail)
(If this assembly is unbolted then new washers may be needed as forum feedback suggests the existing washers dont seal properly if re-used due to the immense pressures seen in the fuel rail)

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Before you tackle this job, ensure the following is done
-Release pressure in the fuel tank by opening the fuel cap
-Remove the fuel pump fuse (15A rating)
-Start and crank the car a few times. (it should not start and just continue to turn over)
-This now releases any pressure in the fuel system and fuel rail.

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(Note: The process below will be different on drive by wire cars 2006-2009)
These cars have a slightly different fuel rail and injector design, however the process will be similar.

Start by removing the black injector cover held down by x2 10mm bolts

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The PCV pipe would need to be moved out of the way in order to remove the cover

Five 10mm bolts are then unbolted which hold down the fuel rail assembly

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Unclip all four fuel injector connectors.

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The actual fuel injector harness and be moved out of the way. Follow the harness around to the map sensor on the top of the throttle body (unclip the map sensor connector).
If you have the cable tie holding the connector then you can unscrew and remove the map sensor
(be careful not to lose the o-ring seal underneath the map sensor when the map sensor is removed).

Gently undo all the clips holding it all in place including a connector. You should now be able to move the whole harness assembly away towards the wiper cowling giving you lots of space.
You would need to disconnect the breather pipe (located next to the oil dip stick) in order to lift out the harness.

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The fuel rail can now be lifted away. Gently lift the rail upwards slowly.
The injectors may still be attached to the rail or get stuck in the inlet manifold. Either way they can be popped off depending on the state of the seals.

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Best practise is to ensure each injector is installed back in their original positions.
So perform the seal replacement on each injector one at a time, or remove them all and lay them in such a way to mimic their position on the rail.

Have lots of rags ready as fuel will pour out.

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Each injector was scrubbed lightly with a tooth brush removing old debris and dirt

Engine oil was used to coat each new seal.
This is an important stage, as the upper seals can easily tear when inserting it back into the fuel rail.

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The areas where the injector sits in the inlet manifold were carefully cleaned, making sure nothing fell inside the engine.

Once I was satisfied all areas were cleaned, each injector was popped back into their original position and the fuel rail was positioned back into place. The coating of engine oil on the seals really helped make popping back the injectors nice and easy.

The fuel rail was bolted back using equal pressure on all bolts one by one carefully watching the main lower seals and ensuring they were being seated properly.

Once complete, the harness was reinstalled and the reverse of removal can be performed.
Re-Install the fuel pump relay fuse and tighten up the fuel cap.

Turn the key to pre-ignition and prime a couple times to build fuel pressure.
Start the engine.
The engine fired back up first time.
A nice and easy job and very enjoyable to do too.

I will continue to start the engine over the next few days and monitor for any further leaks

Thanks to the members on the s2ki forum for advice and help on this



Parts Purchased:
Part: Genuine Honda Upper Fuel Injector Seals
Part Number: 16074-ZY3-000 superseeded to 91301-PM7-003
Supplier: Coxmotorparts

Part: Genuine Honda Lower Fuel Injector Seals
Part Number: 16472-PH7-003
Supplier: Coxmotorparts

Services Used:
None


Resources used
s2ki Forum Thread
"s2000 Fuel Injector Seals Query"
https://www.s2ki.com/forums/uk-ireland- ... y-1202552/

YouTube Video – JDM Muscle
"s2000 Fuel injector Install"


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Task 80 – Fuel Weep 2 (Fuel Injector Leaking)
18-07-20

After the 2nd day of monitoring the fuel injector seals, there was still an odour of fuel coming from the engine bay.

Rather annoyed by this as it turned out it wasn't the seals that were at fault.

One of the advantages of installing all the injectors back in their original positions, it helped make further diagnosis alot easier.

Upon closer inspection, the fuel weep was located in the same position from before the seal replacement. I watched the injector very closely whilst the engine was running and I witnessed a drop of fuel weeping out from the plastic section of the fuel injector body.

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Bingo, this was the problem.

Now, all that was needed was a new injector.


A quick check on Honda lings showed that a brand new injector was £344.32. This was far too much so second hand was the only way to go.
Part 1 is needed

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Several were available on Ebay, with some selling as a set only.
It was obvious the s2000 tax was at play here.
Honda's K20 injectors can be found for around £15 or so, but I guess the k20 is a much more common engine.

I found one from a breaker on Ebay listed for £45.00, I cheekily offered him £35.
He accepted my offer which was a fantastic result.
I guess if you never ask, you never know.

Thanks to BenRNBP on the s2ki forum for offering an injector to me.
Although I had already found one and purchased it when he offered.

Upon arrival, the injector looked in good condition with a gold signature markings from the breakers yard as an ident to help prevent fraud. (i.e. swapping out parts and returning the faulty ones back to the seller)

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A quick clean up and it was ready to install and try.

You could test the injector using a can of compressed brake fluid cleaner, some vacuum hose and a 9 volt battery. Thanks to BenRNBP on the s2ki forum for posting the Youtube video.
I didn't have any of those bits laying around so it was easier for me to just install it and give it a go.

Video Link:


I repeated the initial steps mentioned in task 77 and transferred over the new seals to the replacement injector.

With everything all installed, I fired up the engine.
It started well and once warmed up I gave it a few high revs whilst watching the injector closely.
The initial signs were good and proved that the injector was operating well.

After 20 mins or so, I tidied everything up and gave the car a quick drive.

After the drive it confirmed everything operating as it should with no further leaks.
The car was now ready for a little road trip next month.

Great result, and although the seals didn't need replacing it was a good preventative maintenance.
Super price on the injector too.


Parts Purchased:
Part: Genuine Honda Fuel Injector (2nd Hand)
Part Number: 06164-PCX-010
Supplier: Ebay - Seller: Ukecoparts


Services Used:
None


Resources used
s2ki Forum Thread
"s2000 Fuel Injector Seals Query"
https://www.s2ki.com/forums/uk-ireland- ... y-1202552/

YouTube Video -Hypersonik
"s2000 Fuel injector Test and Clean"


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Task 81 – Quick Spark Plug and Brake Fluid Check
18-07-20

With a potential road trip next week, I was looking forward to actually getting the s2000 out properly since the lock down had eased.

With the engine oil/ filters, transmission and diff fluids already performed earlier in the year, I wanted to double check the spark plugs for their condition and to ensure they were fully tightened before the trip.

Each spark plug was removed and inspected.

It seems all cylinders are burning well, with each spark plug showing good engine conditions.

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Each coil plug was inspected along with the coil plugs connectors.
The coil plug connectors are known to get brittle and break apart over time which is something to watch out for.
This is due to the extreme heat within the rocker cover area, and with s2000's now becoming over 20 years old.

All plugs were reinstalled and fastened down to their revised torque settings.

Brake fluid was also checked and found to be in a good state.
Less than 1% water in the fluid
I used a Laser 4875 brake fluid tester

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The s2000 is ready for that drive


Parts Purchased:
Part: Brake fluid tester
Part number: Laser 4875
Supplier: Amazon UK


Services Used:
None


Resources used
None



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Task 82 – Road Trip to Cheddar Gorge
01-08-20


With it being a gorgeous day, I was looking forward in taking the s2000 on a drive.

The destination was Cheddar Gorge. Always wanted to drive through there as it seemed very scenic along with the winding roads. This was s2000 country.

Tyre pressures and oil levels were checked in the morning and then I set off.

I was meeting up with a friend/colleague. The same person who I went to the Nurburgring Germany with, and whom owns the VX220.

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With it being a super sunny day, he offered to store the s2000 hardtop in his garage and then I can swing by his place on the way back to reinstall it.
Perfect opportunity for the s2000 to go topless for the day.
Luckily I brought along a hat. haha.

This was the route

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It was a great drive, there was quite abit of traffic around Stone Henge with it being the start of August.
I assume everyone was out travelling, and heading for their holiday breaks.
A few stop over's for a break and some breakfast.

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Around the gorge area, it was alittle disappointing. There were just so many cars and people.
It was like driving through a car show.
However being open top it allowed for super views up into the Gorge, it was amazing.
I guess we should have gone there super early to appreciate the roads.

We stopped and found some parking along a quiet residential road, grabbed some quick fish and chips and a quick look in one of the gift shops.
There so just so many people and most weren't wearing and face coverings.

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I took some quick photos of the cars, and then we decided to call it a day and made our way home.

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Overall, not as good as the Brecon beacons and black mountains in Wales (A4069), but glad I finally got an opportunity to drive through Cheddar Gorge.

I do miss that open top s2000 convertible feeling, but I love the look of the s2000 with the hardtop on.
Such a shame I lost my storage intended for the hardtop. It will stay on the car for now.

The s2000 looked great topless, despite being such a subtle car in turned quite a few heads.

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The 9k RPM vtec open top experience, there's no other car quite like it.

Our next road trip: "The isle of man"


Parts Purchased:
None


Services Used:
None


Resources used
None



--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------

Task 83 – Front Passenger Brake Pip Grommet Replacement
01-08-20


During task 67 (Engine service and Transmission Oil Change) earlier this year it was noticed that the front passenger brake pipe grommet was pretty torn up and needing replacement.

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The part was ordered several months ago and with it being on back order, it just arrived.

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Looking at the part, it would need to be fed through up the brake line into position.
However, after having sold off all my brake breeding kit and with me on my own I didn't want to dismantle the brake line and rebleed.

It was also not worth the cost of a garage to do this either.

So the easiest option was to slice the grommet to mount it around the brake pipe.
Re-seal the grommet with Loctite 416 adhesive and then push pop into position.

I went with this route and it worked without any issues.
The grommet positioned nicely around the brake pipe and secured in place perfectly.

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Minor task completed

Parts Purchased:
Part: Genuine Honda Brake Pipe grommet Seal
Part Number: 46380-SH3-000
Supplier: Coxmotorparts


Services Used:
None


Resources used


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------



Task 84 – Refurb Heater Valve Matrix Bracket
15-08-20


On the same day I thought I would tackle the heater valve matrix bracket, this bracket sits behind the battery and bolted with a single 10mm bolt to the firewall. I totally forgot about this bracket when I sent off the other brackets for powder coating in task 76.

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It wouldn't be worth the cost to just send one small bracket for powder coating, so I decided to strip down the bracket myself and repaint using satin black hammerite spray paint for an OEM finish.

To access and remove the bracket, the battery would need to come out.
This was performed very easily, a quick image was taken of the clip and position of the cable just in case I forgot how to reinstall it

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One 10mm bolt for the base, and x2 pozi head screws attaches the bracket to the heater matrix valve body.

Once removed, a wire brush attachment to a drill was used to remove the flaky old coating and it was stripped down in no time.
The bracket had some corrosion on it but it wasn't too bad.

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It was taken up stairs and resprayed, a couple of coats per side. Drying time was 4 to 5 hours with an hour between coats so it took a couple days.
Once completed, the finish didn't look too bad at all. Quite impressed actually.

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I already had the paint to hand so it didn't really cost anything, with only a few hours of my time.
Reinstallation was super easy, overall very pleased with the results.

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Another minor task completed.



Parts Purchased:
None

If required
Part: Hammerite Satin Black Spray 400ml
Paint Part Number: 5084778
Supplier: Ebay – Seller: leoan_923


Services Used:
None


Resources used
None


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Task 85 – Front Bumper Removal Clean & Horn Refurb
24-08-20

I managed to book some time off from work to use some annual leave, one of the tasks on the list was to check the horn.

The horn was working ok, but at times it could be intermittent.

In order to access the horn, the front bumper needed to come off, in order to remove the bumper the front lip would needed to be removed first as it covers some of the bolts which attaches the lower bumper section to the splash guards.

Being a genuine front lip, and with all bolts copper greased back when I installed it in 2018 the bolts all came off with ease.

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Two screws either side of the bumper and the bumper bolts on the top bumper strip.
Not forgetting the two 10mm bolts which are tucked on the side of the headlights.

With the bumper removed, it was pretty dirty behind there so the first thing was to give everything a good clean.
A detailing brush with some autoglym engine cleaner was used to clean away the dirt and grime around the middle sections and around the air pump too.


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Everything looked in good condition, with nothing of concern.
A few minor sections had surface rust including the main front bumper beam.
These areas were wire brushed and treated with Neautraust 661.

The front bumper and lip were also washed on their inside, removing as much grime as possible.

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With the cleanliness all sorted, it was time to focus on the main job at hand, rectifying the main horn assembly.

The early Honda s2000's up until 2002 I believe only had a single high tone horn.
These sound pretty poor even in its day. It basically sounds like a high pitched squeak. haha.
The later 03-06 s2000's featured dual tone horns. Usually a hi/ low disc type horn, the late 07-09 models featured the hi/low shell shaped horns.

I looked into upgrading the single horn to a dual hi/low horn assembly, however it involved cutting and splicing the original horn cable.
Granted it is only a single wire, but I felt it wasn't really necessary.
If the s2000 was a daily driver then it would probably be high on the list.

With that said, I looked into sorting out and making good the original setup. The first thing was to remove the horn itself.
A single 10mm bolt attached the horn assembly to the middle bracket in front of the radiator.
This also holds the air conditioning dryer I believe (the silver metal canister)

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The 10mm bolt attaching the horn was a alittle tight to remove, lots of WD40 was used whilst undoing it slowly.
I was pretty anxious hoping the bolt's head wouldn't shear off.
It would seem that the root cause for the poor operation of the horn was down to poor ground contact to the main bracket (corrosion)
Thankfully the bolt removed successfully, the main connector was checked and fully intact with clean contacts, the same with the contact on the horn assembly.

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The mating surface of the bracket was wire brushed and cleaned, along with a good wire brush clean of the horn itself. Removing all the surface rust.
A quick rinse it was ready for a quick splash of paint.

Some left over Hammerite satin black paint from the heater matrix bracket was perfect.

A couple coats front and black were given, instantly improving the looks of the horn.

Luckily it was a really warm day so the paint dried pretty quickly.

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With a dab of copper grease on the 10mm bolt and on the mating surface of the bracket the horn was re-installed and reconnected
A quick test showed that the horn's function was fully restored with no intermittent electrical operation.
It seemed to sound abit louder too although that could have been psychological.

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Wire brush was used on a drier’s rusty bracket, and neutrarust 661 was used to coat them.

The bumper was re-installed along with the front lip. Job Done!

It seemed like alot of work just to access and put right the horn assembly, but I am glad another minor issue has been fully rectified.




Parts Purchased:
None

If required
Part: Hammerite Satin Black Spray 400ml
Paint Part Number: 5084778
Supplier: Ebay – Seller: leoan_923

Part: Neutrarust 661 Ruster Treater and Converter
Paint Part Number: 661
Supplier: Ebay – Seller: neutrarust661

Services Used:
None


Resources used
None




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------
Last edited by prelude_h22 on Fri Jan 01, 2021 3:33 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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prelude_h22
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My 1999 Honda s2000 [AP1]

Post by prelude_h22 » Fri Jan 01, 2021 3:27 pm

Task 86 – Refurbish Front Headlights
30-08-20


Just before lockdown occurred, it was noticed that the passenger side front headlight lens began to peel.
I was really shocked as a few weeks before it was fine, and then all of a sudden whilst washing the car I noticed the top layer coating was peeling and bubbling away the following week.
It started with a very small patch at first, and then it began to spread and got quite worse.

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I looked it up, and it seemed that it was a common issue on Honda s2000 headlights. The headlights feature a top layer coating which protects the headlight lens from the UV rays of the sun. It would seem that this layer had started to break down.
In fact most headlights with a plastic lens will tend to break down with age and with long exposure to the sun.

The s2000's headlight position in the car park usually faces direct sunlight in the afternoons, which would probably explain why it had started to deteriorate rapidly within my ownership.

The easiest solution without buying new headlights was the tried and tested sanding of the lens.
Many kits exist for this, but the most common one is the "3M Headlight Restoration Kit"

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It features a drill attachment and several sanding grade discs.
A polish attachment and some compound paste, along with masking tape.

You need a good quality cordless drill and several batteries would be required, unless you have a mains powered drill.
I went through 3 and half batteries in the end for both headlights.

Preparation is important, ensure the surrounding bodywork is masked with the included masking tape. This ensures no damage is done to the body work, double up on the masking tape in the corner areas and ensure wide areas are covered in the corners aswell.

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You start off with the 800 grade sanding disc, then followed by the 500 grade, and then the 3000 trizact disc for the smooth finish.
Once the 3000 disc is done, the polish head attachment is used with the compound paste for that crystal clear finish.

The 800 grade is the most harsh grade and is the grade to remove the damage from the lens.
All the old crusty UV layer of the lens were removed using this disc.

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A quick wipe and the results were very impressive.
The headlights now look brand new.

The same process was repeated for the other side, the driver's side headlight also featured a large deep scratch towards the corner of the lens.

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This scratch seemed to have occurred during the Cheddar Gorge trip. It may have been some debris hitting the lens are high speed causing the scratch.
However the sanding process eliminated the scratch completely. Very impressed.

Avoid those manual kits as the drill method makes the process so much easier.
Approximate time per headlight is around 45 mins if the headlights are in bad shape.
You could skip the 800 grade disc if the headlights aren't too bad.

Now that the headlights are completed, the lens are now exposed due to the removal of the UV protective layer.
You could apply a new lacquer over the lens, however the easiest option is to buy a sealant or wax.

I have now applied some Meguiars Headlight Protectant Sealant
(to be honest, any type of wax will probably do)
Time will tell if this stuff is any good.

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This would have to be applied to the lens once or twice monthly especially in the summer months. Ideally when the car is washed, this process should keep the yellowing or UV damage at bay. It's not too critical in the winter months due to low UV levels.

A great result overall.

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Note: The process would be ideal if the front bumper is removed.



Parts Purchased:
Part: 3M Headlight Restoration Kit
Part Number: 39073
Supplier: Amazon UK

Part: Meguiars Headlight Protectant Sealant
Part Number: N/A
Supplier: Ebay – Seller: Car_zone

Services Used:
None


Resources used
None




--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Task 87 – Catalytic Converter Rattle
05-09-20

On a warm weekend I went to wash the s2000 after the Cheddar Gorge trip back in August.

I usually start the s2000 whenever I wash the car so it would give it an opportunity for the battery to charge alittle as it is seldom used, however this time it was different.

Once started, everything seemed normal. The air pump engaged for a few seconds and then turned off as normal.
The engine's rev's began to drop to normal idle speeds and then a rattle was heard.

Immediately I thought it was the timing chain tensioner, however that sounds more of cards flapping in bicycle spokes.
This sounded more of a metallic rattle.

It was coming from beneath the car, so I jacked up the car on one side and held up the car with an axle stand.

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I tried to shake the exhaust but everything seemed solid, including the end section from the tail pipes. All intact with no rattles or funny noises.
I then slid underneath to investigate.

Luckily at that point the rattle started, so I grabbed my phone and took a quick video of it.
It was definitely coming from the catalytic converter.




A quick look up confirmed that the catalytic converters on s2000's are common to go at this age and mileage.
It also depends on how hard the car has been driven. I have taken my s2000 on track a couple times which may have accelerated its demise.
The internal honeycomb section can break loose causing it to shake inside creating the rattle sound.

It can also destroy the secondary 02 sensor inside the catalytic converter too.
The honeycomb section forces itself to slam against it in accordance with the exhaust flow, I would believe this would occur if the car was driven hard.
I also confirmed the above by hitting the converter which exposed a rattle upon impact.

Also thanks to Rich at Performance Autoworks who also advised me to check the front manifold bracket which attaches to the engine block I believe.
This can also cause a rattle sound too, this was checked and confirmed intact.



With the above confirmed, it was time to look at getting a replacement.
An original Honda catalytic converters were no longer available and costing approx. £1000, that would be a no go even if it was available.
Thanks for the members of s2ki forum, the one recommended tried and tested catalytic converter is the Berk High Flow Cat.
It seems that people have been using this part for so many years with no issue. Passing a UK MOT test every time.

It was a no brainer, so it was definitely the part to go for.
Berk offers 2 different types of catalytic Converter

63.5mm and a 70mm

If you intend to retain and use the original standard s2000 exhaust system, then purchase the 63.5mm version.
If you intend to upgrade your exhaust system to an aftermarket unit then purchase the 70mm version
(However do check the specifications and internal diameter of the aftermarket exhaust your purchasing though)

Due to the increased sensitivity of the secondary 02 sensors and the onboard systems on drive by wire cars, there are reports of the management light sometimes illuminating due to the increased flow of aftermarket catalytic converters.
An extra 02 sensor spacer may be required to position the sensor further away. It is something to be aware of if you have a 2007 onward s2000.

I attempted to see if the existing 02 Sensor can be removed, as it would be an ideal opportunity to get a replacement if the current 02 sensor was seized in place. I used a 22mm oxygen 02 sensor removal tool and after several attempts of soaking the sensor in WD40 I gave it a go. With the limited space underneath the car it was a challenge to get impact on the lever. I used a wedge hammer to tap the wrench to see if I could break it loose. However it just didn't budge at all.

I decided it would be just easier to leave it in there and purchase a replacement 2nd hand sensor when the new CAT arrives.

Note, the 02 sensor in the manifold is slightly different to the catalytic sensor and I believe they cannot be mixed.
Also, the catalytic 02 sensors are also different from 99-05 models and 06-09 models. I believe these cannot be mixed either.

The Berk catalytic converter comes complete with rear gaskets and bolts/nuts, the front spring clamps bolts looked in good condition and can be reused.
A new donut gasket would be required for the front flange section. This will also be ordered abit later when the CAT arrives.

Thanks again to the forum member BenRNBP for recommending s2ktuning shop.
They were selling the 63.5mm Berk cats at a great price. An order was quickly placed.



Parts Purchased:
Part: Berk 63.5mm High Flow Catalytic Converter
Paint Part Number: BT1601-HFC-MET
Supplier: S2kTuning

Part: 22mm Oxygen 02 Sensor Removal Tool
Paint Part Number: N/A
Supplier: Ebay - Seller shopdirect365





Services Used:
None


Resources used
None


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Task 88 – Last Day of Summer Commute & Drive Hardtop Roof Latch Fix (Hook Not Springing back)
22-09-20

With the summer coming to an end, it was an opportunity to drive the s2000 to work on the last day forecasted to have lovely warm weather.

Despite still having the rattling catalytic converter, It was a great drive and the car drove really well.
The secondary 02 sensor doesn't really affect actual engine running, so I didn't mind if the catalytic converter 02 sensor destroyed itself.

I also drove the s2000 the next day, unfortunately it rained pretty heavily so the s2000 played in the rain alittle.

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After parking up however, I doubled checked the latches of the hardtop to ensure they were secured, but when I undid them a plastic component just fell from the hardtop latch assembly.

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I hadn't a clue where it came from, but then I noticed that when you press the button on the hardtop roof latch to withdraw the hook back, the hook did not redraw. Comparing the right hand latch, the plastic component was some sort of spacer which allowed the button to push against and retract the latch claw.

The rubber sleeve had seen better days, according to the parts explosion diagram the rubber sleeve alone was not available to purchase separately. I was also thankful I didn't lose that small plastic spacer. The whole latch would need to be purchased, which would set you back around £150 each, and according to previous members they are a pain to swap over too.

The rubber sleeve was designed to wrap around the main claw body to keep the spacer in place, unfortunately it was slightly torn and the rubber was quite brittle due to its age.

The only way to rectify this was to use instant adhesive or Loctite 416.
The collar was bonded into place with the sleeve bonded into positioned after the collar was cured.

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Full function restored :)



Parts Purchased:
Part: Loctite 416 Instant Adhesive
Paint Part Number: Loctite 416
Supplier: Already to hand

Services Used:
None


Resources used
None


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Task 89 – Operating the OEM Honda Cassette Deck
23-09-20

After having a clear out in one of the cupboards at my parents place I finally came across a stack of my dad's old cassette tapes.
What a find.

I've always wanted to find out if the original cassette feature was in operating condition on the s2000.

I found a tape with the Eagles album recorded on it.
Once inserted, the music began to play.

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It played perfectly, I really had forgotten how poor Cassettes really sounded, the frustration of fast forwarding or rewinding to get to the start of a chosen track. Ahhh the good ol days.




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Remembering the times when I used to record from the radio with my dad's cassette deck at home for my favourite songs.

Lovely bit of nostalgia



Parts Purchased:
None

Services Used:
None


Resources used
None





--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Task 90 – Catalytic Converter STOLEN
25-10-20

Once the order was placed for the Berk 63.5mm Cat on 30th Aug, I was advised by s2ktuning that Berk do not have any stock and the lead time would be end of Sept and into the first week of October.

I thought about it and even thinking of getting the Tegiwa 70mm high flow cat version, however it was likely that our isle of man trip would be cancelled so I confirmed that I was happy to wait.

I had a UK vacation planned with the missus for around 13 days before the 2nd lockdown hit.
On the last evening I left, I started up the s2000 and charged the battery for alittle while.

This confirmed the car was fine and the CAT was present.

When I returned, I intended to clean the s2000 and when I started it up to let it run the dreaded loud exhaust sound was present.
I knew exactly what was wrong, I was so annoyed as I knew the exhaust system would be completely butchered.

A quick glance underneath confirmed it, even more worse is that that they cut off the front manifold pipe containing the front lambda sensor.

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I knew I wasn’t going to claim on insurance, as insurance companies are pretty useless with type of thing.
So the only way was to repair it with 2nd hand parts, and then get my old mechanic friend to help me. Rich at Performance Autoworks.

So a shopping list was needed.

-Front OEM Manifold
-Springs, bolts and nuts to connect the CAT to the front manifold
-Front 02 Lambda Sensor
-Rear 02 Lambda Sensor
-Catalytic Converter
-Genuine Honda donut gasket (for manifold and CAT connection)


The irony was that I was going to replace my original CAT due to it developing the common rattle. It was already on order.
I guess it was just sheer bad timing and bad luck.
By this point, the Berk CAT which I ordered back in task 85 (at the beginning of September), still had not arrived and was due at the end of October mainly because of Covid-19 delays.

The biggest issue I had was the rear main exhaust section. There were a few available on ebay second hand, but the assembly was absolutely huge.
I would need quite a large van to pick one up, and I would never be able to store it in my flat and deliver it to the garage. Logistics would be a nightmare.
Even Coxmotorparts stated they could not courier me a brand new one.

Note: The rear main exhaust system is still available from Honda and costs around £500 ish. (Quite expensive)
If you order from LINGS.com, they can deliver it to you or your garage.

https://www.lingshondaparts.com/partsca ... f/B__0200/


Quite concerned, I then contacted Rich at Performance Autoworks for his advice and showed him the images of what was left of the exhaust.
He stated that the rear end can be salvaged and repaired.
Fantastic news, I was so relieved.

So all I needed were the above listed parts, and Rich could do the rest.

Parts received

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With the car not driveable, I had to arrange for transport to get the car to Rich in Fairford.
I found a guy called Ian who runs a company called Mercia vehicle Logistics. Nationwide delivery and very reasonable cost too.
Amazing guy, pleasant, punctual and great communications through WhatsApp. Highly recommended.
https://www.facebook.com/merciavehiclelogistics/

Once all the dates were arranged, the pickup on the 11th November went smoothly. I gave him the keys and he went on his way to Performance Autoworks.
With the pickup being at 7am, it allowed me to continue with my day and head to work.
It took over 3 hours for Ian to get there, and the drop off went smoothly. Rich confirming the car arrived safely.

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Rich got to work on it the next day, and confirmed via email it all went smoothly without a hitch.
He did say the heat shield lower bolt of the front manifold was slightly tricky to remove.
These commonly rust due to catching water splashed up being on the lower section, he managed to get it off though.

Fantastic work, the s2000 is now back on the road. I picked it up a week later.


Pick Up Day (14th November)

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The repair was spot on, he welded on a new flange to the end rear exhaust which mated perfectly to the BERK CAT.
Also quite relieved both the 2nd hand lambda sensors were in good functioning order.

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I can’t recommend Rich at Performance Autoworks enough. I have used him since 2009 back when I had a Honda Prelude 2.2 vti.
Always use him for big major jobs. He really knows his Honda’s.


The drive back on the day of pickup in the pouring rain was amazing. Felt so good to be back in the s2000.

My concern now, it may happen again.
Although there isn’t really any value in the aftermarket high flow CATS, these people can still do it again not realising it isn’t an OEM CAT.

I was so gutted when it occurred. Luckily they didn't damage any other part of the car.
I hope this helps anyone who becomes a victim of Catalytic Converter theft.



Parts Purchased:

Part: Genuine Honda Downpipe Manifold
Part Number: 18100-PCX-305
Supplier: Ebay (2nd hand) - Seller s2000poweruk

Part: Genuine Honda Spring Bolts and Nuts (to connect the CAT to the front manifold)
Part Number: 18231-SR3-A22 (bolts x2) & 18230-SV4-000 (spring x 2) & 90115-659-003 (Nut x2)
Supplier: Ebay (2nd hand) - Seller s2000poweruk

Part: Genuine Honda Front and Rear 02 Lambda Sensors (pre facelift)
Part Number: 36531-PCX-014 (front) & 36532-PCX-004 (rear)
Supplier: Ebay (2nd hand) - seller SLB-olena

Part: Berk Technologies High Flow Catalytic Converter (63.5mm version)
Part Number: BT1601-HFC-MET
Supplier: s2ktuning

Part: Genuine Honda Manifold to Cat Donut Gasket
Part Number: 18115PCX014
Supplier: Coxmotorparts


Services Used:

Performance Autoworks (Fairford/Gloucestershire GL7 4BX)
Contact: Richard Voaden
Tel: 01285 711 733
Email: info@performance-autoworks.co.uk
http://www.performance-autoworks.co.uk/index.php


Mercia vehicle Logistics
Contact: Ian
Tel: 07490140785
https://merciavehiclelogistics.co.uk/
His Ebay listings
https://www.ebay.co.uk/itm/CAR-TRANSPOR ... Swi-db5Zbw


Resources used
None


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


Task 91 – Tilt Sensor Install
06-12-20

After going through the ordeal of having your catalytic converter stolen, I really felt the need to try and protect the car to help prevent it from re-occurring again.

There were several preventative actions that I could take:

-Install a tilt sensor to my existing alarm system
-Weld a plate or bars covering the entire Catalytic converter
-Engrave labels/stickers to the CAT with a tracking or serial number
-Install a Decat (wont be legal)
-Hire a lockup and keep the car garaged (expensive)

I didn't like the idea of welding anything to the chassis of the s2000, so I decided that a tilt sensor was the way to go.

I contacted Rakesh from Auto Alarms UK, an old acquaintance to see if it was possible and which sensor he'd recommend.
Rakesh originally installed my Toad AI606 alarm back in April 2018 (Task 1).
In hindsight, I should have installed a tilt sensor back then, but you just never can predict these things.

He immediately recommended the 507M tilt sensor from directed electronics (Clifford), this was much more reliable than the Toad equivalent.
There were no issues retro fitting it to my Toad system.

A date was booked and I visited him at his home for the install. It was a long drive but worth it.

Arrival at his place

Image


Ultra sonic sensor update

Image

The install for the tilt sensor went without a hitch, it was a piece of cake for him.

Image


I was quite impressed how well the system worked.
Apologies for the poor video quality




Granted, it will probably not stop them next time, but it may deter them or create unwanted attention.
With anything in life, if the thief's want it, they will have it regardless of what gets in their way.

At the end of the day, its just a car. Your safety is more important, do not try and confront these low life scum.
They can carry and threaten you with dangerous weapons. It's just not worth it.


Parts Purchased:

Part: Directed Electronics 507M Tilt Sensor
Part Number: 507M Sensor
Supplier: Rakesh from Auto Alarms UK R&D Electrics Supplied this for me


Services Used:

Autoalarms UK R&D Electrics
Contact: Rakesh
Tel: 07739 540000
Responds well on Whatsapp
Email: Autoalarms@gmail.com

His Facebook Page
https://en-gb.facebook.com/fonz6466/

His Ebay Shop
https://www.ebay.co.uk/str/fonz6466?_tr ... 7675.l2563

Resources used
None


--------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------


End of Year 2020
31-12-20

With 2020 drawing to a close and despite Covid-19 ruining the year, I did manage to accomplish alot on the s2000.
The best moment was being able to take it out for a day trip to Cheddar Gorge with the roof down.

With the likeliness of a property purchase in 2021, things may have to take a back seat with the s2000.
It may have to go, but I will try my best and hold on to it for as long as I can.

Here's to more adventures in 2021.

Thanks for reading guys
01-01-21

Scott560
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My 1999 Honda s2000 [AP1]

Post by Scott560 » Fri Jan 01, 2021 4:20 pm

Epic post as always! Plenty of detail logged and decent pictures - not something people tend to take the time to do!

Regarding the horn - did you brush off some of the hammerite where it mounts to the central member? This is the earth point I believe (the connectors are normally single pin?).

Bummer about the cat being stolen - it seems to be an increasing concern. Just have to hope that being parked very close to the house is enough of a deterrent.

Regarding selling it - don't do it! you will always regret it given the huge amount of work you have done personally to it - you never get that back with a new car, and if the circumstance meant the car had to go - the opportunity generally would not be there with a new car either.

I think I need to start making a task list lol
'00 UKDM 2.2VTI H22a8
'97 UKDM 2.2VTi (Gone)

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prelude_h22
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My 1999 Honda s2000 [AP1]

Post by prelude_h22 » Fri Jan 01, 2021 4:52 pm

Thanks Scott560. Appreciate your comments :)

Yeah, I wire brushed that section really well and applied a tiny bit of copper grease.
Your right, its a single pin connector and relies on the body for earth connection.

I was pretty gutted when the CAT got stolen, but I guess you can never stop these type of people.
Maybe I should decat it. lol

I know what you mean about selling, when I sold my 5G 2.2 vti prelude I regretted it so bad although it allowed me to tick one of my bucket list in owning an s2000.
Something which I would never do now considering their prices, current climate and direction in which cars are moving now.

Shall see how it goes with the new property purchase.
Finger crossed I can still afford to keep it.

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My 1999 Honda s2000 [AP1]

Post by geriatrix » Fri Jan 01, 2021 8:57 pm

So enjoy your write ups, hope you find a way to keep the S2000. And I'm STILL enjoying your 5G.

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prelude_h22
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My 1999 Honda s2000 [AP1]

Post by prelude_h22 » Fri Jan 01, 2021 9:39 pm

So enjoy your write ups, hope you find a way to keep the S2000. And I'm STILL enjoying your 5G.
Great hearing from you @geriatrix :)
Happy New Year. Hope you and the missus are keeping well.

I am literally back on my feet now after a pretty dark and grim 3 years.
Will try all I can to keep the s2000. Its an amazing machine.

Appreciate you comments, I love writing these logs.

Lovely to hear your still enjoying my old Prelude. I hope it gives you many more years of enjoyment.
They are seriously a rare sight on the roads these days.

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My 1999 Honda s2000 [AP1]

Post by toadster » Sat Jan 02, 2021 5:12 pm

Lo :D
Blimous :shock:
Epic work :mrgreen:
Cheers for posting ;)
Toadster
Image

geriatrix
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My 1999 Honda s2000 [AP1]

Post by geriatrix » Sat Jan 02, 2021 8:50 pm

"Lovely to hear your still enjoying my old Prelude. I hope it gives you many more years of enjoyment. They are seriously a rare sight on the roads these days."

Yes, haven't seen another Prelude on the road for ages.

Except that is, for the one literally just around the corner from me, which bizarrely is also a Ruby Red 5G, but automatic rather than manual, and is in lovely condition. I think the guy's laid it up for the winter, but I really want to take a pic of the two of them together sometime.

And a very Happy New Year to you too, and I hope the house business works out for you.

BTW I used to deliver cars to journalists and the like, Mitsubishis, Alfas, Mercs, Lexus, Fiats, and Hondas. I'll never forget the first time I took out an S2000. I picked it up from Marlow, and joined the A404 where it climbs up toward Handy Cross, and absolutely floored it. I've never forgotten that feeling as it all kicked in, and that eventually led to my first Prelude purchase, a petrol blue 4G. That S2000 was probably the nicest car I ever had to deliver. The worst two were both Mercs. One was a manual with a floor pedal operated parking brake. Hill start just not possible without a third leg. The absolute worst was a diesel A-Class with a clutchless gear change. I had to collect it from some bloke it had been lent to, and he claimed it was probably the most unpleasant car he'd ever driven. After driving the awful thing back from Norwich or somewhere to High Wycombe I had to agree with him.

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